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Would you work with another Behaviourist?

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Missy

Miss- Pig!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '13 8:20am PST 
I've been weighing up the option of working with a new behaviourist with Missy. However, considering Missy's age and how long she's been like this i'm doubtful we'll make any real significant changes to her behaviour other than what we have already. The Behaviourist admitted herself that we probably won't be able to completely change her behaviour now but that it is worth a try. Well of course she's going to say it's worth a try wink But in all honesty i haven't got money to waste ( who has! ) and if we can't learn more or change the behaviour we've already got then what is the point of working with someone new?

Do you think you'd bother? Or would you accept that management and doing what we're doing is the best option now and in the future?
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Trixie Bean!

none so blind as- those that will- not see
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '13 10:55am PST 
Honestly Missy, if the behaviourist isn't fairly sure that some progress can be made.. I wouldnt bother. No point flushing money away laugh out loud
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Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '13 11:03am PST 
It's definitely worth a try!

You do hear the "every dog is different," "there is no one way to train a dog," and so on. Which really is true. Most people around a long time who typically associate with trainers have those experiences where a perfectly good trainer you'd done perfectly well with just isn't getting a handle on that one particular dog, so you try someone else and in a session or two you just see this synch of things really working. When I feel like it is "not happening" and know I am dedicating myself, that's my internal buzzer.....we need to approach this some other way.

You yourself are perfectly savvy enough to discern approaches you do not want to implement, as your dog's guardian, and those that take a different approach which causes you less funk.

I would suggest trying someone who has some different take, or wants to approach from some different angle. As long as you are cool with that angle. What I can say is that you are very well versed in how your dog responds to approaches to help with her problems, so with a fresher approach you'll pretty much be able to tell close to right away if this is connecting more. Two or three sessions are all you need.....not to have some great turnaround, but to get that sense if things are looking promising.
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Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '13 11:47am PST 
Dogs are people tolaugh out loud How can anyone give you a guarantee? When I was interviewing trainers for Shadow I ran from anyone who guaranteed me they could fix her. I think Tiller is right a couple of sessions should give you a handle on what's happening, then you can take it from there.
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Missy

Miss- Pig!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '13 12:13pm PST 
Yes, i do see the behaviourist's open admission to maybe not being able to improve on the behaviour as a good sign, don't get me wrong. But i'm also wondering whether she will be able to help us any further and tell me anything i don't know already. I know that might sound big headed but you know what i mean. She does come highly recommended by a friend though and they have seen massive improvements with their dog's reactivity ( although she is a much milder case than Missy ) so that got me feeling hopeful.
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Sanka- I'll Miss- You

The ground is my- newspaper.
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '13 12:49pm PST 
I think more importantly, do YOU want to change the behavior? Is it something that takes the fun out of life or have you gotten so used to it that it really isn't much of a bother anymore?

If you're just doing it because you feel compelled to make a dog fit better into society, then I'd take a step back and look at my personal ideals. Just because a dog doesn't fit into every "normal" category doesn't mean their life is bad nor their owners. You just have to find what your ideal is. What improvements, however minute, would make things better and if the cost of time and money is worth it to you.

And heck, even if you're just curious to the work behind it, give it a try. If there's something worthwhile to come out of it to you, it's nice to give it a try.

But don't get pushed into it. Everybody nowadays pushes everyone to a behaviorist with every little blip a dog has.
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Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '13 1:10pm PST 
Sanka raises a good point.
Shadow is a wingnut, she's always gonna be. That said I kind of like her the way she is. I don't really care that everyone else hates her, I love my little lunatic. If you are looking at improving quality of life that's important. Hers or yours. But if you are trying to make her conform to someone elses idea of a good dog, is that really what you want?
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Missy

Miss- Pig!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '13 2:19pm PST 
Well, it's certainly never fun when she's acting up, but i have gotten used to managing her behaviour. We have made improvements, but she's been worse the past couple of days and it just got me thinking about the whole subject of a behaviourist again. I sometimes just ask myself why i've never been able to get a proper handle on this and that bothers me.

I will have to have a think. She needs a health check before referral, so that's first on the list.
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Member Since
12/24/2012
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '13 8:18pm PST 
I'm wondering if you worked with a behaviorist in the first place or just someone calling themself that? If someone doesn't have a behavioral sciences degree, then they're just a dog trainer. There's nothing wrong with that but it doesn't make them a behaviorist. Behaviorists have advanced degrees because they have advanced learning and usually advanced experience as well. Which is why they generally cost more than a dog trainer. So it's like comparing apples to oranges.

Were they a Veterinary Behaviorist, Associate Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist or a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorists? If it was me, for a serious problem, I'd save my money up to see a real behaviorist instead of trainer after trainer.
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Missy

Miss- Pig!
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 25, '13 6:26am PST 
Guest, we've seen one behaviourist before. She did have qualifications and was also in continued training/learning. She did give us some good tips and we worked with her for many moths. But there was also things i wasn't that impressed with. She asked us to attend a training class she ran at the club she worked at and while Missy was very good there, i felt we was kind of forgotten about and our support and help from her dwindled.

This new behaviourist works from vet referrals and is more qualified than the last behaviourist.
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