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Dominance and Agression?

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

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Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '13 9:33pm PST 

Max, don't worry about all the Alpha stuff. Dogs are just dogs, some are more assertive but they aren't trying to take over. It's good that you've already graduated but you do realize that training needs to be maintained for life. And if the basics are boring teach new and fun things.

Edited by moderator Mon Feb 11, '13 11:38am PST

Edited by forums moderator
Scooter

Sloppy Licks and- Tail Wags!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '13 9:48pm PST 
okmMax good luck

Edited by author Mon Jan 28, '13 2:32pm PST

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Scooter

Sloppy Licks and- Tail Wags!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 24, '13 9:49pm PST 
okmMax good luck

Edited by author Mon Jan 28, '13 2:32pm PST

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Squ'mey

too old to eat- any more KD
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 25, '13 8:27am PST 
Max. Socialization is more than play dates with dogs he knows. It means meeting all kinds of people & dogs, in all kinds of places, wearing all sorts of things, all ages.
What daily training do you do? What do you do for exercise? When he runs up to tackle, what does his body look like? Does he hold his tail up, tucked, or neutral? Are his ears flat on his head. perked?
How is he when he meets dogs on-leash?
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Lobo

"Stubborn" dogs- don't need- corrections
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 25, '13 8:55am PST 
In my experience, using corrections on a dog that is growling can actually exacerbate the issue. It definitely did with Lobo.

Instead, when Max is interacting in a good way with other dogs, reward him with something that he really, REALLY loves. That can be yummy food(Lobo's favorite is cooked chicken or liver), or an awesome toy or a game of tug(Lobo's favorite reward for "Fetch" - fetch doesn't come naturally to Lobo). It can even be an environmental reward, like sniffing(for Lobo, sniffing > food, always).

My *favorite* reward for Lobo, is tossing a treat and letting him go find it. He becomes absolutely enthralled in the game, so much so that he often doesn't even notice the other dog - if I do it right and don't put him over threshold.

I agree with the above people: Please try not to be too concerned with all that 'dominance' and 'alpha' talk. Dogs are dogs, people are people. I think it's an insult to their intelligence to claim that they think we are also dogs. I also believe that it is very dangerous to treat dogs the way other dogs treat dogs. Not only can they be extremely unpredictable, but many are also insecure bullies. (:
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Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 25, '13 10:26am PST 
Sounds to me like you are dealing with a typical teenager. I will be putting up a thread soon....have been working on it....which may be helpful. One thing I can say off the top of my head, however, is that it is a bit of a myth that you take your dog to a puppy obedience class, he does really well, and then is a trained dog. No, he is a trained young puppy laugh out loud Very often, as age and hormones come more into play, not only do new behaviors come to the surface, but the dog is very likely to have selective amnesia regarding the commands he has done so well with.

I think a LOT more of these pet trainers need to have teenage dog classes, not only to allow their dogs this resource, but also in an attempt to make it more common knowledge that even though the puppy graduated from puppy class, you may be in an era where the dog becomes more difficult and needs a refresher course. Very often, you have those who are more positive in their training orientation who assume the dog is having "issues" or getting "reactive," or those more balanced or correction-oriented in their puppy approach who assume their dog is becoming "dominant." Neither are right. He's just a teenager wink

My advice to you is that as training class worked well for him before, you take him in for a refresher course. That way, too, you have a trainer familiar with your dog who can offer good advice about "street" issues as well, meaning just around the house and neighborhood behaviors you are seeing.
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Mr.Maxy

No Pet Motto
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 25, '13 12:43pm PST 
That's true Tiller but maybe Mom could sign me up fur intermediate classes and other stuff
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Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 25, '13 3:41pm PST 
Sounds like a great idea, Max! way to go
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Winnie Mae

Just let me jump- it!
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 25, '13 5:01pm PST 
You've already gotten a lot of great advice, but I did want to add one thing. You mentioned that you don't let Max "win" at tug-of-war any more. In my limited experience, preventing a dog from "winning" tug-of-war doesn't really have any long-standing effects on their dominance over you; rather, it will just sour your dog to the game of tug-of-war. After all, how fun is it to lose every time?

Intermediate obedience courses sound like a good idea way to go Good luck!

Edited by author Mon Feb 4, '13 12:05pm PST

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Lobo

"Stubborn" dogs- don't need- corrections
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 25, '13 5:48pm PST 
Definitely agree, Winnie Mae. You also don't want to create a dog who isn't confident. I play games that Lobo wins, because, simply, I like it when he wins. It doesn't effect our relationship at all. It's just a *game* lolol. I respect him when he asks, and he respects me. (By that, I mean he lets me know what he's had enough, and I let him know when I've had enough.)
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