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The Correct Response to Play Nipping???

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
Opheila

It ain't over- till the fat- kitty sings
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 29, '12 8:03pm PST 
As I've written before, Callie can be a rowdy boy when he plays. I know what he's doing is excitement rather than aggression. It only happens when I come home and both dogs are joyfully dancing. When Sophie gets tired of his nipping she'll give a big "AWWWROOOF" and he'll stop. What would be the right human reaction? Some books have said a high pitched sound, some say a deep sounding NO or STOP. I wouldn't clock him, but I notice raising your hand in the gesture makes him stop instantly. I just don't like doing that. Apparently his past owners kept him in check like that. He was well trained by somebody along the way. But it's just defusing when he gets hyper happy. What voice tone is right?
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Smokey

Let's play tug!!
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 29, '12 8:59pm PST 
In my opinion, if he nips you, be a tree, and don't look at him, touch him, or talk to him for a few minutes. If he doesn't seem to respond to that, and is still jumping and biting and not noticing that you're frozen, a timeout in his crate instead. If he nips Sophie, and you know that she will warn him before biting, and he will heed the warning, I probably wouldn't intervene. I intervene if I see a lot of one-sided play where the other dog looks scared but doesn't seem to know how to speak up. If the dogs are well socialized, the play looks reciprocal, and the playmate will say "NO! OUCH STOP IT!" in no uncertain terms and be heard, I tend to think they have it under control.
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Jackson Tan

Lad about town
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 2:43am PST 
I generally correct with an ah ah, but in the case of mouthing and rambunctious behaviour, I trained mine using time outs.

Sometimes we got up to 10 time outs a day, but it was a cracking success.
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Sausage

feed me
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 5:43am PST 
Both ignoring and yelping are actions puppies typically understand - theatrically ignoring is a calming signal, and yelping is how puppies teach each other bite inhibition. The dark yelling can for some be confusing and frightening.

I don't reckon there's a correct way though.
You could teach your dog a general "no" command.
The dark voice in my experience often automatically gets coupled with more threatening body language, as well. I personally don't want to communicate anything other than "that's a bit much, you're hurting me".

My dog would NOT stop nipping with the tree and ignoring methods, three YAOW!s and she nipped less and less, and then would begin running off to pick up a toy when she got over excited. You'd think she was a retriever, she always greets people with something in her mouth. rainbow
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Titus

Cave canis- vigilo omnis
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 11:04am PST 
How old is he..? I've found that in older puppies yelping can actually excite them even more. I prefer to withdraw all attention; stop playing and ignore him. If he continues to nip while being ignored, I'd close him in a small, boring, puppy-safe room for ten or fifteen second time out. Repeat as necessary. Good luck! way to go
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Jagger- **ADOPTED**

Ewok/Wookiee- Cross
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 1:20pm PST 
My foster boy was mouthy. He never hurt me; he had GREAT bite inhibition but I didn't want him to do it. Most people aren't fans of being mouthed and I wanted him to get a home!

If he put his mouth on me, I ignored him completely. Even if he was wrapped around my ankle or pulling on my clothing. Putting his mouth on me made me totally disengage. If it went on too long, I put him away. After several minutes I would let him back out to try again.

I used this both for his excitement mouthing of me and his overly exuberant play with Risa. If he couldn't control himself, he got a "time out" and a chance to try again. He was a quick study. It didn't take him more than 3 time outs to figure out he needed to be a bit less crazy!
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Opheila

It ain't over- till the fat- kitty sings
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 31, '12 9:18am PST 
I've been trying the "I Am a Tree" idea for a few days and it seems to be working...you can see his few little doggie brain cells turning like " Hey CHOMP playwithmeheyheycomeonandplay...Mommee?Mommee?Hum, now if I just put my head in her lap she's lovin' me again...". Think he'll figure out the connection pretty quick...I hope so...all the little bruise dots up my arms somebody's going to think I have a habit, wacky dawg
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Smokey

Let's play tug!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 31, '12 10:07am PST 
Sounds good!
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