GO!

Help Me I have Tried Everything and Im at my wits end...

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Lupi

I\\\'ll do- anything for a- treat!
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 29, '12 11:19pm PST 
Don't punish her at all for the growling. She already feels nervous; being punished will reinforce the negative feelings she has towards other dogs. You may want to start off by sitting in the car and letting her notice dogs from there-wherever she feels safe. When you see her notice a dog, reward her immediately. Don't wait for her to react or not react, just give her the treat right away. What you want is for her to begin looking to you for her reward whenever she sees a dog.
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Addy, CGC

Let's go for a- walk!
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 3:50am PST 
So stand on the outside/gate of a dog park with her and let her observe other dogs and if hes growls/snaps tell her wrong and leave it and if she doesnt reward her.

No. Absolutely NOT! You do not punish her for being nervous or afraid. That will only make her more nervous and afraid, if she knows there's a good chance of being punished whenever she meets another dog. You are making your problem worse.

Stop and think. If you were afraid of something, and got "corrected" every time you showed nervousness around that thing, would it make you more confident around it, or less?

As Luigi(?) said, you need to start rewarding her whenever she notices another dog, before she even reacts.

And if her tail is tucked, she's afraid. Her reaction is not unpredictable until she does it; she's telling you clearly when she's afraid. You just haven't been "listening."
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ARCHMX Asher RL1X RL2X RL3X RL

we will dance in- the ring without- words
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 5:19am PST 
Don't even take her to the dog park. Why? No reason to do so.

Since this seems to be a close proximity issue, it should not be hard to handle, but YOU are going to have to become your dog's advocate. YOU are going to have to help her be safe.

It DOES sound like reactivity, so, as Lupi said, no punishment at all. You could make things worse.

Take a look at www.reactivedogs.com
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Squ'mey

too old to eat- any more KD
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 8:24am PST 
I agree with Asher on this..why even bother with the dog park? We all have visions of our dogs romping playfully, getting all pooped out, then sleeping for hours. It's not the reality. Some dogs just aren't good candidates for that activity.
If you do take her to the fence..don't correct her for the growl..correct yourself..you brought her too close for comfort. Back up until she does not react. It's not about the fence, per se, but rather her threshold for reacting.
Return that shock collar. It is no good for you or your dog. You sound like you were not given any instructions on its proper use. There is an excellent thread started by Tiller on e-collars. They have their uses, this is NOT one of them.
There will be no overnight *cure for your issue. It is a long process, but every time you let her practice the behaviour it will take that much longer to help her through this.
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Sarah,- CW-SR,- CW-G1, CGC

Million Dollar- Mutt
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 10:27am PST 
A dog park is not a good place to practice being around other dogs. Dogs inside the park tend to get really stressed out when there are dogs on the "wrong" side of the fence. There is a man at my park who has been brining his ten month old gad puppy and walking the outside of the fence with her. Wile I admire and appreciate that he is trying to do the right thing wi th his dog, the poor dog gets charged at, barked at, growled at, etc. I feel bad for the dog and she is not having good experiences. Even my own dogs get in on the barking and they are pretty good dogs! A better place to practice being by other dogs is somewhere with much fewer dogs, let a petsmart or pectoral. Even better would be a well taught reactive dog class smile. Also remember that not e Rey person is a social butterfly, and not every dog is either! Your dog just might like flying solo!
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Sarah,- CW-SR,- CW-G1, CGC

Million Dollar- Mutt
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 10:27am PST 
A dog park is not a good place to practice being around other dogs. Dogs inside the park tend to get really stressed out when there are dogs on the "wrong" side of the fence. There is a man at my park who has been brining his ten month old gad puppy and walking the outside of the fence with her. Wile I admire and appreciate that he is trying to do the right thing wi th his dog, the poor dog gets charged at, barked at, growled at, etc. I feel bad for the dog and she is not having good experiences. Even my own dogs get in on the barking and they are pretty good dogs! A better place to practice being by other dogs is somewhere with much fewer dogs, let a petsmart or pectoral. Even better would be a well taught reactive dog class smile. Also remember that not e Rey person is a social butterfly, and not every dog is either! Your dog just might like flying solo!
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Lupi

I\\\'ll do- anything for a- treat!
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 1:32pm PST 
I feel I need to clarify, since my suggestion of the "dog park" could be misleading. In my city, these are generally unfenced, large, off-leash areas where you will also find joggers, bikers, and others taking advantage of the park. Staying on the edge (which could be miles long) or even keeping to a quiet area of the park wouldn't be stressful, nor would you encounter many dogs at a time. But you would get the chance to allow Vienna to notice other dogs without feeling threatened.
I have to agree with the other posters, that the type of dog park with an actual gate, where dogs congregate around the entrance, would probably be far too sttimulating for Vienna.
Also, your goal is not necessarily ever to have her playing with other dogs (although she may eventually enjoy doing that) but rather, to enable her to walk past a dog without getting scared and feeling the need to launch a preemptive strike.
Have you looked into any behaviorists available in your area?
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Vienna

Little V
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 2:16pm PST 
yes and i have an appt with one the 4th of january for Vienna
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Rexy

I dig in mud- puddles!
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 2:30pm PST 
Just a note of caution, are you certain that the behaviorist you have chosen is certified as such?

It's incredibly common to be misled by someone who claims to be a behaviorist when they are nothing of the sort. A behaviorist should have post-graduate education in an animal related field (Masters or Ph.D.).

Here is a link to a recent thread on the topic:
What is a Behaviorist?
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ARCHMX Asher RL1X RL2X RL3X RL

we will dance in- the ring without- words
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 3:10pm PST 
Actually, I don't think this is a situation that absolutely calls for a behaviorist. Or a Vet Behaviorist/trainer team. (and if it were, I would be the first to say so). Not that a behaviorist is ever a bad idea.

This sounds like a case of reactivity amplified by the use of aversives. A trainer who specializes in reactivity should be able to help.

I know I am not a behaviorist, but I do reactive privates for Ali Brown and I run her reactive classes when she is out of town (like next Saturday).

The important thing for now is understanding why it is happening and working to give her a bit of a "brain vacation" until you can start working on the behavior itself.
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