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How do you teach drop on recall?

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
Thor CGC

God of Thunder
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 23, '12 7:39pm PST 
I am wondering how people teach the drop on recall.

Thanks!
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Jackson Tan

Lad about town
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 24, '12 2:11am PST 
My husband taught a killer down when he started teaching the dog in German, lol. The command rings out better we found and he pays more heed to it. He did such a good job that JT will usually hit his 'platz' automatically when he returns to us. I had started the job with luring but he finished it off with just loads of practice. I don't ask for it often though, I'm pretty easy.
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Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 24, '12 5:41am PST 
I like to teach the dog to down on a marker (like a towel). Spend a few sessions ensuring the dog understands what the exercise is all about and ensuring you build value for the behaviour. Then start adding a small amount of movement. Once the dog is reliably dropping on the marker you can begin fading it by folding it up, using smaller cloths, etc. Before long, you'll have a nice drop on recall with a happy, confident dog.
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ARCH Demon RL1, RL2, RL3, RLV

Intimidation- seldom- facilitates- learning
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 24, '12 8:15am PST 
I just make downs FUN, FUN, FUN!!! I teach the dog to drop as fast as they can to get in the game.

I start wherever the dog needs to be (luring, bending for the signal), but ALWAYS give the verbal cue first, then the hand signal. When the dog is down, I click and toss a treat off to the side for the dog to chase, then repeat. The dog eventually learns A) to jump the prompt (ie hit the deck when they hear the verbal cue) and B) to drop where they are because the treat will be tossed as soon as they are in the down.

The game looks like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFd1e8HY7s8

And it creates this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoyxxWrkL7Y

As to the cue, I don't think it needs to be commanding. I have been told by judges in the ring that I have the softest drop cue they have ever heard. That is because I taught it in a soft voice. I have seen people NQ in the Rally ring for using a harsh voice on this exercise then say it is needed. It's not. It is all about reinforcement history and making it a really fun behavior.
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Thor CGC

God of Thunder
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 25, '12 3:32pm PST 
The drop on recall looks great!

Are you giving some release cue that I can't see in the video, or is the tossing of the treat the release? I wouldn't want Thor to get up, even to get the treat, until he is released or given another command.
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ARCH Demon RL1, RL2, RL3, RLV

Intimidation- seldom- facilitates- learning
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 28, '12 8:14am PST 
The click marks the behavior and in this case serves as the release. Food is tossed to reset for another rep (I can't ask for another down if the dog stays in position). It also helps teach the dog that "Down" does not have to be relative to my location (ie in front or heel) and that dropping in place as fast as possible is the key to the game.

This is for fast drops, in place. Keep in mind that it is just one criteria on a down; duration, distraction, distance, location, those are all different criteria I practice at different times. This is how I get a fast drop on a dime, be it a moving down, a drop on recall or distance signals.
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