GO!

Dog attacking cats?

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
(Page 2 of 3: Viewing entries 11 to 20)  
1  2  3  


Member Since
12/02/2012
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 21, '12 1:20am PST 
Your dog has a high prey instinct or prey drive. If you love your cats as much as you love your dog, you will separate them or one of them (or both ends) will get injured.
[notify]
Koda

Born to run -- loves to sleep
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 23, '12 6:50pm PST 
I've kept a close eye on him lately. A few days ago, he went after the older cat, Smokey, while she was laying on the couch alone. I yelled at him for that. Smokey doesn't really care about him too much. She is a little causious whenever she sees him and will run if he comes up to her. But our other cat won't even be in the same room as him... I don't blame her.
[notify]
Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 23, '12 7:45pm PST 
Yelling at him, water... These things are not going to stop prey drive. When Ember grabbed our neighbor's cat (he walked straight up to her), I had her by the scruff of the neck, front end lifted off the ground so she couldn't shake him, and I had to punch her in the face at least twice to get her to let go. I think the only reason she was as slow as she was and as compliant as she was is that I had only had her about 3 weeks (and she was peeing when he popped out from under our porch). She was so emotionally wrecked she had no confidence in anything.

Whether the cats pay attention to him or not is irrelevant. He is initiating the aggression, so his behavior is what matters.

Letting him roam and just keeping an eye on him creates a very seriously dangerous situation for your cats - especially your older cat.
[notify]



Member Since
12/02/2012
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 23, '12 10:06pm PST 
"When Ember grabbed our neighbor's cat (he walked straight up to her), I had her by the scruff of the neck, front end lifted off the ground so she couldn't shake him, and I had to punch her in the face at least twice to get her to let go."

Wow, I don't think you should have punched Ember, it seemed quite harsh to have to punch him. Although I agree with you on having to do more than just saying no to the dog when he does things to the cats, you don't necessarily have to be violent at the dog either.
[notify]
Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 24, '12 7:55am PST 
Domestic dogs bite with an average force of 320 pounds of pressure. You can not just pry their jaws apart. You can not take a dog pumped full of adrenaline, hellbent on killing, pat them on the head and ask them to please stop dear, that's not appropriate.

Yeah, I punched her in the face. If it happened again, I would do it again. It's that, or let her kill the neighbor's cat.
[notify]
Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 24, '12 10:48am PST 
In the moment, you do what you have to. A cat was about to get killed. If that cat's life, or a neighbor's love for their pet, is worth less than one moment with your dog? There's a big problem there. You do what you have to do, and technically in that strong a prey response you aren't dealing with the same emotions any way. But even were you, your responsibilities as a dog owner don't stop with your own dog....you have a responsibility to your own community. That's why we have BSL problems, and huskies very often make that list. They remind us that being responsible for our pets actions is part of our responsibility. We wouldn't have BSL if we had owners who ensured that their dogs weren't bringing injury, death and ruin into their communities.

I had a Saint Bernard try to kill my own pet, a very jarring memory (my dog was brought close to death) somewhat mitigated by the fact that the two owners of the dog in attendance were doing everything in their power to get their dog off my pet. I still am appreciative to them for that, for in the moment my dog, who was the innocent victim, mattered more to them. That is an ethic I myself carry. I haven't been brought to that line, but there's nothing I wouldn't do were I in that position. Memory goes to the chimp attack in CT a few ago, where his owner....who raised him from a baby; he was like a child to her....ran into her house, got a knife and stabbed him. You do what you have to. If not, you, socially speaking, are a community threat if you own an animal with teeth.

Ember's actions showed she KNOWS, as a husky owner, she has an extremely limited window of time to prevent her dog from killing a cat. A cat is alive today because as a husky owner she knows of the risks inherent to a husky, and thereby the responsibilities. If she were applying for an adoption to my rescue and had applied for a husky and related that story, she would go up in my book. I want to release good ambassadors into the community, and part of that is owners who know how to prioritize, part of which is not letting your pet bring tragedy into a neighborhood.

High, HIGH marks to Ember for having the composure to FIRST get the front end off the ground to disable her physically, and then doing what it took to get the cat out of her dog's mouth. A cat today is alive, and a neighbor's world isn't shattered into a million pieces, as a result of her actions.

You as a dog owner must be aware of the potential of your breed, manage him carefully with those potentials in mind, and know whatever the outcomes are either to your fault or to your credit. We take on a silent vow or promise to our neighbors when we take on a dog.

And to the OP, I am totally backing up Ember here. Dogs can gain confidence in their drive and prey responses. Your dog could be building to a day where she will kill one of your cats, and then it will be too late. Please be careful. You are on a serious fault line and your cats' lives hang in the balance.

Edited by author Mon Dec 24, '12 11:03am PST

[notify]
Dylan aka- Dilly

frisbee- s rule
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 24, '12 12:36pm PST 
"Although I agree with you on having to do more than just saying no to the dog when he does things to the cats, you don't necessarily have to be violent at the dog either."

and what do you suggest? in that situation, you have seconds.you MUST stop the attack before there is murder.

and chances are, there was no lasting damage to the realationship with her dog.

years ago, I rescued a starving great dane. totally unbeknownst to me, he was also DA. after having him a few months, he was allowed in the yard with my brittney mix. in seconds, he had him by the throat. when I saw that white dog, turning red, I attacked. the dane learned 2 lessons that day.
1 I was not afraid of him
2 I could kick his a$$.

he lived with me 5 more years, to the age of 12,he never curled a lip at a fly

not that I recomend that to anyone, but sometimes, ya do what ya gotta do.

back to the topic, if you are not carefull, you are going to have a dead cat, or maybe 2
[notify]
Koda

Born to run -- loves to sleep
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 24, '12 4:55pm PST 
I'm going to have him on a leash at all times while he's in the house. I also will not leave him alone in ANY room in the house. Should I get up to go to the bathroom, Koda will be put outside. I am not afraid to hurt Koda should he ever get his mouth on a cat. I'm not afraid to admit that I love both cats more than I do Koda. If it takes me stabbing him to stop him, I might just have to do that. Either that or I'd slap, kick, or punch him. He's quite the submissive dog. If I spray him with water for getting to wild with our other dog Sassy, his head and tail will both go down and he'll just stand there.

I haven't gotten a reply from the trainer I e-mailed but when he does I will be sure to tell everyone what he said. Thank you!
[notify]
Koda

Born to run -- loves to sleep
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 26, '12 2:18pm PST 
Here's what my answer was:

"Attacking is much different than chasing, when you allow this to happen you are getting closer and closer to the dog killing a cat. The only safe way to keep them is to separate them completely, cats in one area and dog in another. Medication and training can help, but some animals have a severe prey drive and it isn't safe to keep them together. Contact a veterinary behaviorist that can see the behavior if you are unsure and they can tell you if the dog is likely to kill the cat or if behavior modification and medications may help with your training program."

I guess I'll get a hold of a Behaviorist then.
[notify]
Koda

Born to run -- loves to sleep
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 26, '12 2:31pm PST 
Well, just got news that Koda attacked Sassy over a bone the other day. Is it normal when you've got two dogs in a house to fight every now and then? I wouldn't think so... He's never done that before... Sorry, I've never had two dogs in the house at the same time before...
[notify]
  (Page 2 of 3: Viewing entries 11 to 20)  
1  2  3